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What do I do as a community manager at Appozite?

Appozite, Social software

I’m a community manager. My official title is Appozite‘s Chief of Community Experience, but that’s a fancy way of saying community manager.  The role of community manager has recently become sort of trendy, though people have been doing this work as long as companies have had customers. Jeremiah Owyang wrote a great post on the key tenets of community management more than a year ago. Web Worker Daily has a recent discussion of what community managers do. Among other useful and interesting tidbits, Dawn Foster embedded a presentation in her post, which is great and I recommend you watch.

So, what do I do as a community manager?  A friend once called it “playing on Twitter”, which made me realize that outside of the small set of people who are community managers or work with community managers at their companies, very few people know what I do. I wonder what my parents tell people my job is – “I don’t know, but she’s always on the internet.”

That is true, though; I am online a lot. If I’m at home or in my office, then I’m at a computer. If I’m out of my office, then I’m never far from my phone. But of course it’s more than that. At the most basic level, I’m a communicator (which is perfect for me, given that I’m finishing up my doctorate in communication studies). Community manager communication comes in a few different forms:

Writing

I write all the time. I write blog posts, tweets, website copy, user guides, marketing materials, press releases, white papers, you name it.

Reading

I keep up with the goings-on of a lot of different individuals, companies, and industries. I read dozens of blogs and online publications in order to keep up with these things. I read about social media and web innovations, organizational behavior, e-commerce, shopping, style and fashion.

Participating

I want to get to know our users. To do this, I have to interact with them. I can’t just read their Twitter posts and lurk around on their websites; I have to actually get to know them. So I comment on their blogs, respond to their tweets, and post about their deals. And when I have a question for them, they answer because they know me.

Responding

One of my most important jobs is responding to user questions and concerns. The more users we have, the more time this takes. I try to respond as quickly as possible, so this means I can be checking my email and Twitter DMs late into the night. But I want our users to know we really care about their experience, and responding promptly is one of the best ways I know to show that.

Networking

I interact with people. Not just users of our software, but people in the software industry, PR and social media professionals, community members, Twitterati, and so on. I try to go to at least one in-person networking event a week where I can meet and talk to other people doing the same kind of work I do. It’s great to know that if I have a problem or question, I have a large group of people to call on. Good conversation with smart people and tasty beverages is one of the best parts of my job.

So yeah, I am on the internet a lot. But I’m also at conferences and meetings and parties. My job is to evangelize about Appozite and our products (including CheapTweet and ZiteFeed), as well as to work with users to ensure they have the best experience possible with us and our products. Being a community manager is a pretty awesome job.

Jenn @ February 12, 2009

3 Comments

  1. Nicole Caverta February 14, 2009 @ 11:35 pm

    Thank you!

  2. Charles Hill February 16, 2009 @ 10:33 pm

    You are a professional friend

  3. Indah December 19, 2015 @ 3:25 pm

    Miks te niii kahepalgelist potiilikat teete? Venelastele fcks jutt ja eestlastele hoopis teine. Kuigi mf5lemad on Eesti kodanikud (jah kodanikud, sest kes tahab Eestiga oma saatuse siduda, siis saab ka fche Euroopa lihtsama Eesti kodakondsuseksami tehtud!). See on sulaselge diskrimineerimine rahvuse pf5hjal ja vaenu f5huamine!

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